When a child gave me hope for a better world for my son

We all know how difficult it is for a differently abled individual to navigate the world with its prejudices. There is much to be desired when it comes to acceptance and inclusions. It often makes me nervous thinking about what kind of a world will my son find himself in when he grows up and when I might not be around to be his eyes , ears, and voice. So, in the midst of all the uncertainty, when a child walks in like a breath of fresh air, it gives me hope.
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The High Costs of Autism

Autism was a word barely known 20 years ago, with America’s only real reference an award-winning performance of an “idiot savant” in Rain Man. Projection rates and real calculations vary, but the Autism and Developmental Disabilities Network reveals a startling 78% increase in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnoses between 2002 and 2008 alone. The cost of autism is high, with economic costs falling in separate categories of direct, indirect, and intangible.
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8 mistakes I made as a mom of an autisic child

Before my son’s diagnosis of Autism, I had never even heard about the condition. No one in my family was familiar with it and I knew of nobody who had this diagnosis either. So I started with a blank slate, with absolutely no idea what to do, how to deal with its plethora of challenges , who to reach out to or where to start. I had no clue if what I was doing was right or wrong. Just as my successes were my own, so were my failures. We, as a family, learnt along the way as we experimented with different things. Over the years we’ve perfected a few things or so we think and there are some that we are still trying to figure out .
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Early Intervention and Autism

Current estimates reveal that approximately 1 in 59 children will be diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, commonly referred to under the blanket term “autism.” Autism is a spectrum, and there are other similar disorders that fall under the same umbrella, such as PDD-NOS (pervasive developmental disorders, not otherwise specified). In an extremely young child, such as a toddler, these other disorders may present as an autism diagnosis. As the child becomes older, a proper diagnosis is more abundantly clear.
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Surprisingly Complicated

In 2003 our boys, Adem and Eren, were diagnosed at 15 months old with autism. At the time, we found very little information available to figure out what to do. Not only did we have difficulty finding a playbook, we also didn’t know what to feel. I remember getting off the subway on my way to work because I couldn’t handle watching a father embarrassed his little girl was singing him a song she learned in school in public. How can you be embarrassed? I haven’t even heard “Mommy” yet.

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To Whom Care Is Given – 49 And Autistic

We often hear about the work of care givers, the hardships and sacrifices made in the process of caring for those they love, but it is rare to hear from those who need that care and the perspectives from that side.

I am 49 years old and autistic. These days, my symptoms are minimal, but that wasn’t always the case. I was developmentally delayed in many ways, in language, motor skills and intellectually. I did not speak until age four and required several years of speech therapy. Many simple physical skills also eluded me, such as tying my shoes or those requiring balance, like riding a bike or even running in a straight line. This was the 1970’s though and mild to moderate autism was seldom officially diagnosed. I was just considered ‘slow’ by adults and ‘weird’ by other children.

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How my son’s autism changed me

The other day I was talking to a complete stranger at my son’s summer camp’s bus stop. We chatted like old friends meeting after years.There is something that bonds us all together…the experiences, the pain, the joy ,and the lessons. There is so much to share. We finally parted, promising a lunch date along with some spa time…knowing well, it was easier said than done 🙂
On my way back, I thought… I was never the kind of person to just approach someone and start talking. I preferred the comfort of familiarity. And today, here I was, chatting with someone I had never met and feeling the most at ease about it. It got me thinking – my son’s diagnosis of Autism has changed me as a person. It was time I gave Autism it’s due.
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Creating an Individual Education Plan For Your Special Needs Child

Parenting a child with special needs is filled with unexpected challenges. Few of us are prepared to support our unique offspring with extraordinary medical needs or non-neurotypical processing of their environment.

But, they are our children, so we learn as quickly and efficiently as possible.

Today we will tackle creating an individual education plan for your special needs child. We must consider planning, implementation, and refinement. Building an incredible team is absolutely imperative to developing a customized plan that develops your child’s strengths even as it mitigates their challenges. And, finally finding ways to include your child in the process gives them ownership of their education and helps with motivation.
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I’m not a supermom

I’m not a supermom but I get that a lot. Having a child with Autism does not make me one. Please let me be weak and let me cry, let me make mistakes, let my guard down, and let me just be a mom, a wife ,a woman, not a “super-someone”.

The day Vedant was diagnosed with Autism, life handed me a cape and said “now you fight and never stop doing so”. But there are days when I’m exhausted. I want to simply kneel down and wish that never again should a mom have to fight for what is rightly her child’s and hope that the world will be more sensitive to any child who has challenges.
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Autism Poll: Regrets or things you’d have done differently

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