About Bipolar Disorder

What is Bipolar Disorder?
If you are reading this article, it may be because you or a loved one has been diagnosed with bipolar disorder. There may have been an episode of mania, hypomania, depression or a mixture. There may be a lot of questions, confusion and maybe even anger. Bipolar disorder does not discriminate. Men and women can equally be diagnosed with bipolar disorder. Where we live and how we were raised may have an influence on us. However, there is no specific person, place or thing to blame for having bipolar disorder.
I was diagnosed with bipolar disorder at age twenty-four. Since then, there has been a large trial and error process. There has been hospitalizations, medication, mistakes, anger, regret, happiness and sadness. The good news is, is that I have reached stability. I have been hospital free for years. That does not mean that I am cured from having bipolar disorder. It is a mental health disorder that I face everyday.
The most important thing we can do is to get properly diagnosed. For some people, it can take years to receive a correct diagnosis. In Bipolar Disorder: Love and Relationships, I go over being open and honest. I understand that this can be very difficult. However, it is very important. Let’s go with my personal and most recent example:
My family and I moved across the country for a new job opportunity. Clearly, for someone with bipolar disorder, this can create a lot of uncertainty, stress and even some triggers. One of my main stressors was the fact that I would need a new psychiatrist. I had been with my doctor for over five years. I was very stable, happy and content. Even still, I received two months of my medication and made the move across the country. Once I reached my destination, I called multiple psychiatrists. Some didn’t have open appointments and some didn’t take my insurance. One even wanted four hundred dollars up front to do my beginning paperwork. I was really starting to miss my old doctor and was very worried. I finally found a doctor that had a recent appointment and that took my insurance.
During my appointment, I was sitting in front of a new doctor and his intern. It was my time to be open and honest. He wanted me to describe myself. And my first question was do you want to know the me, stable on my medication or unstable? He wanted to know how I acted unstable. So here is my list of traits I have if I am unstable:
• Extreme mania
• Severe depression
• Psychosis
• Risky behavior
• Hypersexuality
• Lack of sleep
• Rapid speech
Needless to say, when I am not stable, I am completely disabled. My family has no choice but to hospitalize me if I do not take the proper steps for self care. I suffer from bipolar disorder type one. There are a few different types of bipolar disorder:
• Bipolar Disorder Type 1
• Bipolar Disorder Type 2
• Cyclothymic Disorder
• Mixed Features
• Rapid Cycling
These are a few of the different types. Some of us even suffer other mental health disorders along with having bipolar disorder. Here is a list of mental health disorders that could occur along side bipolar disorder:
• Anxiety
• PTSD
• Schizoaffective
• Borderline Personality Disorder
• ADHD
• OCD
• Eating Disorder
• Substance Abuse
• Alcoholism
• Addiction
• Postpartum Depression
• Seasonal Affective Disorder
There are many other disorders that could be present as well including physical ailments. It is very important for us to stay open and honest with our medical staff and to get properly diagnosed. We need to hone in on each individual disorder so we can pinpoint our symptoms. Read more in: Bipolar Disorder: Substances, Sex and Major Life Changes.

About the author:

2 Times NEW release author on Amazon. Amy Perez has a Master’s degree from Nova Southeastern University. Amy has spent hours inside mental health facilities with a first hand patient perspective. She has worked with mental health patients in Miami. Amy lives in Florida with her family and orange tabby cat.

Feel free to connect om social media:

Instagram: @avidauthor

Twitter: @psychologyamy

Facebook Group: Mental Health Encouragement

Share & Like:

Anxiety & Finances

Finances

This topic is very important for those of us with anxiety. Many nights can be spent questioning my finances. Did I pay that bill? Will I have enough for gift giving? Am I saving enough? These are relevant questions. However, I don’t want to answer them when I am trying to fall asleep. Having too much uncertainty about our finances in the current moment and in the future can spike our anxiety. This would be known as a trigger. We will go over that in a later chapter. Whether we have acute anxiety or more severe anxiety, this area has an impact on all of us. We need money for our basic needs such as groceries, gas and housing. Also, we want to use it for the extra things like entertainment, new clothes and even a vacation. It is important to set up our bank account to take away some anxiety about our current situation and in the future.
Any financial mistakes from the past are just that, the past. Obviously, we will still deal with these issues in the current time and future. Whether we charged too much on a credit card or bought an expensive car or furniture. It is okay. What is important is that we learn from our past decisions and repair our present and future situation. Easing anxiety about our financial situation happens in stages. The first stage is organizing everything in writing. We can do this on paper or on a computer. We need to decipher what we bring in and what goes out. Some of us work part time, full time or are on disability. No matter what we bring in and pay out, being organized is key.
Here is an example of having everything written out:
In:
Part time job: $1,090.00 Monthly
Additional income: $800.00 Monthly
Total: $1,890.00
Out:
Rent: $600.00
Electric: $65.00
Cable: $40.00
Insurance: $100.00
Gas: $50.00
Groceries: $600.00
Credit Cards: $75.00
Medicine: $25.00
Total: $1,5550.00
Left Over: $335.00
In this situation, everything is written out and calculated. There is no question regarding what is coming in and what is going out. Now we know that there is $335.00 left over. How can we utilize this left over money to minimize anxiety? We organize it. This is stage two. Now that we know how much money is used for our needs, the rest of the money can be put into accounts for our wants. First, let’s pick out four of our wants. Do we want to save for our future? Do we want to use more money to spend on our loved ones or pets? Do we want more fun money? The goal is to choose areas of our life that are important to us and put our money towards those things. We can either create an envelope system to put extra money or use separate bank accounts. With banking apps for smart phones, organizing our money has never been easier. Here is an example of how these accounts will look:
Main account/needs: $755.00
Emergency fund: $250.00
Fun/Vacations: $160.00
Children/Pets: $90.00
401K: $150.00
Gifts: $60.00
These accounts will likely start out small. Many banks allow us to have a few accounts open at once. Some banks require a minimum balance or direct deposit. Calling our bank is the best way to gain clarity of what we can do and to find out minimum requirements. Often times, bank accounts can be opened online or through an app. With our example, there is $335.00 left over. Here is how we will divide the left over income:
Emergency fund: $85.00
Fun/Vacations: $50.00
Children/Pets: $50.00
401K: $50.00
Gifts: $50.00
As we can see, the total equals $285.00. We have $50.00 left over. This money will be allocated to pay back any debts we acquired. Do we owe someone money? Do we want to pay more than the minimum payments on our credit cards? Credit card repayment is included in the budget but we can add extra money to pay back the debt faster. Each account has it’s purpose. These accounts give us peace of mind. We have our emergency fund set up for the unexpected. This can be a car repair, extra medicine cost or a home repair. The fun and vacation account can be for anything from an ice cream treat to a weekend getaway. For the children/pet account, this can be set up for new clothes, medical expenses or an activity. The 401K is for our future. This can give us something to look forward to. This account builds over time. Lastly, my personal favorite, the gift account. Gift giving is very important to me. I always want to make sure that I have money for holidays and birthdays.
When it comes close to Christmas time, I might add a little extra money into this account. I might put only $50.00 into the emergency account and then put $85.00 into the gift account. Because the money is organized, these accounts get replenished as they get used every month. Therefore, when it is bedtime and we start to fret about money, we can put our mind at ease. We have accounts set up for certain situations. Reducing our financial stress can have a large impact on our anxiety. Organizing and understanding our finances can be an important step in improving our quality of life. Improving our quality of life can affect those around us. Learn more in The Anxiety Warriors by Amy Perez MS Psychology.

About the Author:

Amy Perez has a Master’s degree in General Psychology from Nova Southeastern University. Author of The Manic Episode Series and Bipolar Disorder: Thriving, Triggers, Love & Relationships.

Instagram: @avidauthor

Twitter: @PsychologyAmy

Facebook Group: Mental Health Encouragement

Share & Like:

Anxiety and Health

Health and Anxiety

Having anxiety can force us to focus more on ourselves and our health. The goal is to limit our anxiety as best as we can. In addition to talking with a psychiatrist and/or therapist as well as taking any needed medication, there are many steps we can take as far as health is concerned. We can start with a balanced diet. In addition to eating a balanced diet, it is important to eat regular small meals throughout the day. Also, staying hydrated is important. Not being in optimal health alone can trigger anxiety.
Continue reading “Anxiety and Health”

Share & Like:

Bipolar Disorder & Nutrition

This is one of my favorite subjects to talk about. Many of us with bipolar disorder can suffer weight gain from medication, bouts of depression or both. Until I got a reduction in medication, I was suffering from extreme food cravings. I literally could not stop eating fried food, chocolate and candy. I packed on thirty pounds in less than a year. It is possible to maintain a healthy weight and take medication. It does take some work and dedication.
Continue reading “Bipolar Disorder & Nutrition”

Share & Like:

Anxiety & Self Care

Anxiety and Self Care
Taking excellent care of ourselves can be easier said than done. Having anxiety can make tasks feel more difficult. Especially if our anxiety has been building for hours, days or even weeks. It is imperative that we create a life full of self care. We must practice daily hygiene, practice hobbies, relax and get an adequate amount of sleep. Anxiety can feel endless and relentless. However, we can practice good self care, push through our day and thrive through our tasks. The first step is creating a daily routine. The second step is sticking to our routine. This will give us strength through our anxiety.
Continue reading “Anxiety & Self Care”

Share & Like:

Bipolar Disorder and Education

 

Education
Education is so important for someone with bipolar disorder. The more we know and understand, the better off we will be. Psychology is a science. Because of that, it is always changing. There will always be new information regarding bipolar disorder. There are now more medications than ever before. I know that many medications come with side effects such as weight gain, hair loss and tiredness. We are all unique and have a different genetic makeup. The medication that works for me may not work for a close family member. Our goal is to stabilize the chemicals in our brain.
Continue reading “Bipolar Disorder and Education”

Share & Like: